The Find Your Grind Theory of Change

The most powerful learning solution for future readiness: an evergreen strategy to learning.

Summary

  • Research supports the need for educational programming that addresses career exploration and personal development.
  • Social Cognitive Career Theory (SCCT) considers the complex relationships among self-efficacy (beliefs about ability), outcome expectations (beliefs about consequences of an action), and goal-setting (decision about taking an action).
  • Sociocultural factors such as gender, race, ethnicity, socioeconomic status, sexuality, and (dis)ability are integral and cannot be separated from this process according to SCCT.
  • Progressive learning sets students on a path of building confidence, intuition, and expertise through investment and reinvestment in new or increasingly complex knowledge and skills.
  • Over time, a student’s interest, knowledge, skill, confidence, attitude, action, improvement, and interaction regarding a particular goal or mission mutually reinforce one another, encouraging continued reinvestment.
  • External factors such as school culture, resources, curriculum, individual characteristics, and elements of the larger context influence this progression in both individuals and groups.
  • The concepts described are interwoven throughout FYG’s platform to ensure whole student development and preparation for the future in 5 areas of short-term, medium-term, and long-term outcomes: self-discovery, occupational awareness, self-efficacy, social capital, and aspirations. 
  • Short-term outcomes focus on growing knowledge and awareness, medium-term invests and reinvests to focus on action and belief, and long-term focuses on adaptability skills, optimism for the future, and overall self-efficacy.

Read on to discover the details of the Find Your Grind Theory of Change.

Part 1: Progressive Learning Cycles

Part 2: Social Cognitive Career Theory and Career Exploration 

Part 3: The Find Your Grind Logic Model

White Paper: The Find Your Grind Theory of Change